Youths show us what they believe about school

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As urban educators, teacher educators, and activists in Cleveland and Washington, D.C.,  we’ve seen dropout (or push-out) rates average close to 60% annually. That means 60% of freshmen in these schools never graduate from high school with the most basic of life tickets: a high school diploma.

We asked over 500 Cleveland, Washington DC, northern Virginia, Sierra Leone, Haitian, and Benin high school and middle school students to consider these questions and answer them with photographs and text. We offer this site to students, teachers and teacher educators worldwide who are interested in increasing student achievement in urban centers, and any educational arena working with the under serverd.

  1. “My grandmother is 71 years old and continues to work because she doesn’t have any money to retire and money is a constant problem in our house:                              


  2.                                    -Andranic, Euclid, Ohio, 2009

Through Students’ Eyes  I  info@throughtstudentseyes.org  I  www.throughstudentseyes.org



©2013 Through Students’ Eyes      Updated  2/2013       Logo design courtesy of Jason Hines

  1. “Children, once at school, have to follow carefully the instructions, advices given by their teachers. The good behavior of the students towards their teachers at school helps them to be successful.”
                                  -Justin, Republic of Benin, 2013

  1. “Sometimes, the democratic leadership does not really give a good result, but that depends on the way you do it. You have to show to people that you work with them and for them, and this way, you will have their conscience and the result will be positive.


  2.                                  -Joseph, Port au Prince, Haiti 2012

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Are students aware of the things in their own lives that support or interfere with their success in school?

How do some underserved students excel in spite of an environment that doesn’t value education?
High school students tell you what they learned: 
(click to view)